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Ideas adapted from UCLA Library http://unitproj.library.ucla.edu/col/bruinsuccess/03/01.cfm

When to Cite?

When Should You Cite?

  • When you use the author’s exact words
  • When you summarize someone else’s words
  • When you read someone else's words and write it in your own words
  • Anything which is not your OWN original thought
  • Facts that are not common knowledge
  • When in doubt, CITE!

References:
Caravello, P. Avoiding plagiarism: Strategies & resources. Presentation.
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. (2001). 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: APA, p. 348.

Why Cite?

Why Should You Cite?

  • To add credibility and support for your ideas!
  • To ensure the accuracy of scientific and scholarly knowledge.
  • To protect intellectual property rights.

References:
Caravello, P. Avoiding plagiarism: Strategies & resources. Presentation.
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. (2001). 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: APA, p. 348.

How to Cite

How Do I Cite?

You can cite your sources by quoting, summarizing, and/or paraphrasing.

Quote What? Using the Author’s exact words
How? Use “quotation marks” to mark someone else’s words
Why?
  • To support or add credibility to your arguments.
  • When the original is difficult to rephrase.
  • When original wording is great!
Summary What? Condensed/distilled version of the author’s words or ideas
Why? To include only main points of the original text
Tip: A summary is shorter than a paraphrase and covers main points only.
Paraphrase What?
  • Restating, in your own words, the author’s words or ideas

Why?

  • To simplify or clarify the original text
  • To demonstrate comprehension of original source

Paraphrasing Tips

  • Rewrite it using your own words
  • Rewrite it using your own sentence structure
  • Quote distinctive words or phrases taken from the original source
  • Accurately represent the author
  • Always cite the source of your information

References:
Caravello, P. Avoiding plagiarism: Strategies & resources. Presentation.

Note-Taking Tips

  • Distinguish direct quotations from your own summary or paraphrase
  • Identify the source you are taking notes from at the top of your piece of paper
  • Carefully label photocopies or print outs that you have—always know the original source
  • Hint: email article citations to yourself from article search engines—some will even email in different citation styles!